Easter 🐥 Greetings

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Magnolia Photo by Nick

In this Easter week I wish you peace, happiness and relaxation.

I thought I would post some photos from my walks in parks nearby.  Everything seems to be coming alive at this time of year.

The flowers and trees look so beautiful, it would be great to share them.

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White Narcissi Photo by Nick
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Park Photo by Nick
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Bluebells Photo by Nick
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Genista Photo by Nick

I’ve added a short poem based on the seasons of the apple tree.

 

Apple Tree Seasons 

 

In Spring, pink apple blossom grow delicate buds

New life springs forth

 

In Summer, fully grown blooms take shape as apples

Warm,strong sunlight help them form

 

In Autumn, rosy red, sweet tasting apples

Ready to pick from the tree

 

In Winter, a bare tree stands out amongst

White snow, goodness going back to the roots

Poem by Nick

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Keeping Active with Fibromyalgia

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Now that Spring is here and we are beginning to have lighter evenings. It’s a good time to consider reviewing your fitness and exercise regime if you have one.

After I was was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia in 2004, I found that exercise helped me a lot as I struggled to find things I could do. When you have Fibromyalgia it is a daunting prospect, keeping fit. Particularly starting out for the first time, with a new exercise.

It’s really important to keep as healthy as possible, as your level of stamina fluctuates so much.

I have made a list of everything that has helped me that you could try.

Walking

I found walking to be the most accessible and best for my circumstances.  Walking can help to boost your energy levels and enjoy nature.

If you suffer from low mood, walking on a regular basis is a good non medical therapy, to help feel more positive.

If you are on a low-income, it’s no problem to try out as there is no sign up charges.

If you are new to walking it is best to start with 5 to 10 minutes at first and gradually increase this as your body gets used to the exercise.

You will need to try out a pattern that suits you.

When you first start you may need to get some comfortable shoes and wrap up well with thermal layers on cold days.

Have a look at my post on walking  for more tips.

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Hydrotherapy

I found gentle exercise in a warm water pool can help. The water supports your body and has less impact on muscles and joints.

Research has shown that lying in warm water helps the body to relax and lowers pain perception.

A therapist that specialises in hydrotherapy or a qualified physiotherapist that has a good understanding of fibromyalgia, can help you to work out some exercises.

Your local sports centre or gym may have these facilities and let you have a couple of trial sessions.

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Pilates

Pilates strengthens the body as a whole, the main aim is to improve core strength. Regular sessions can help to reduce the risk of injury by increasing flexibility.

I  developed my own tailored exercise routine, by trying out different exercises, from visits to a physiotherapy practitioner.

If you go for physio ask the practitioner for advice and help about what exercises are best for you.

I practice these regularly once a day, for about ten minutes in total. Although, I had to work up to doing this amount gradually at first.

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Sitting Exercises

If you have limited mobility, sitting exercises could be a better option than other ways of exercise.

The NHS website has sitting exercises along with flexibility exercises that might be worth trying.

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The NHS live well  website has a lot of really useful tips to get you active.

I hope this short post has given you some new ideas on exercise for Fibromyalgia. My goal is as always to help others with Fibromyalgia and similar invisible illness.

I’m interested in hearing from any fellow sufferers of Fibromyalgia, particularly if you would like to share your experiences on my blog.

Inspiring people with illnesses and injuries

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In Britain we need to hear about an inspiring leader, at the moment, who despite personal injuries and constant illness overcame these and became a national hero.

I have fibromyalgia. What gets me through bad pain days?

After reading a Facebook post, asking fibromyalgia sufferers to swap ideas about what helps on bad pain days.

I immediately thought… chocolate. 

Then I thought…

Banish the bad if possible, like excessive stress.

My symptoms get worse on stressful days, as most people do when under pressure.

An invisible illness like fibromyalgia can mean it’s difficult to explain how we are feeling to others; especially people close to us.

It’s not like having a cold or broken leg, which over time recover. The pain and other symptoms are always there in some guise and will never go.

Its good to remind myself occasionally of the good things l can enjoy.

Perhaps making a list…

1 Chocolate!

2 Reading a gripping book

3 Writing a post

4 Chatting to friends 

5 Watching a good film

6 Walking

7 Inspiring people…..

Thinking more about this got me imagining what it might of been like for someone many years ago, who fell ill or was injured. Perhaps a famous person in history who has shown great courage and achievements, despite suffering from numerous illnesses, debilitating wounds and depression.

Vice-Admiral Horatio Nelson; a British Navy admiral, may not immediately come to mind.

Nelson is a celebrated hero in Britain for his great victories in the Napoleonic Wars and at the Battle of Trafalgar.

He was born on 29 September, 1758 at Burnham Thorpe in Norfolk. Accounts of him from the time describe a slightly built, sensitive child. Perhaps not obviously someone who would become a great courageous hero. Although early biographies describe Nelson as a brave and honourable boy. His mother died when he was just 9 which upset him for years to come. He joined the navy at the age of 12.

In his lifetime Nelson contracted malaria and survived. He was hit by musket ball distroying his arm and had it amputated. Nelson was reportedly giving orders again, after half an hour of the amputation. In 1798, Nelson lost his sight in one eye during the Battle of the Nile.

Sailing on his most famous ship called Victory, in 1805 at the Battle of Trafalgar. Nelson invented a new strategy for steering his fleet of ships. The Spanish and French fleets were trying to invade Britain. The British fleet won the Battle with Nelsons leadership but Nelson was hit by a musket ball and fatally injured. He died after hearing that his fleet had won the battle. A state funeral took place at St Paul’s Cathedral in London on January 9th, 1806.

A memorial to Nelson, named Nelsons Column stands to this day in London in the middle of Trafalgar Square.

Its inspiring to read about Nelson and visualise living on board ship back then. I visited the Nelson Museum  in Great Yarmouth, Norfolk and discovered more about him and the illnesses and injuries Nelson suffered. The most incredible thing, I thought was his heroic achievements in spite of these. 

How did he do it? 

He fought and won battles; showed incredible courage and determination to succeed. Throughout all this he described himself in a selfless way, writing in a letter;

‘I got a little hurt this morning’. Nelson had been hit in the face when a shell exploded and was blinded in the right eye.

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